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My Ugly Boy

No, this post isn't about Robert E. Howard fans.

I just found out that Skunk Anansie is back doing music, and released a new album about a month ago. This song, 'My Ugly Boy' is on it, and it's certainly not Skunk Anansie at their best, but it does have Skin, looking beautiful and with that fantastic voice, and I'll go through a sub par song for that.



Also, because I cannot resist, here's a Shield Wall moment from Robert E. Howard's wikipedia page:

"Black Canaan" is one of the most significant of Howard's works when discussing his attitude towards race. It tells the story of an uprising of "swamp niggers" led by a magician named Saul Stark, who are defeated by the white Kirby Buckner. Saul Stark's back story is tied to Africa, emphasizing the racial conflict. Another character, The Bride of Damballah, is described in stereotypical manner as a black woman. Howard also wrote "The Last White Man" set in the year 2000 when the black population has overthrown the complacent white race. The hero is a white man, although a Viking-like throwback rather than the rest of the weak white men of the era, who unsuccessfully opposes the black race. This story, however, has less to do with race and more to do with Howard's common subject of the rise and fall of civilized empires in the face of rising barbarism. Howard wrote mostly about the clash of cultures rather than racial groups.


I love this group.

I may, just may, send them cards at Christmas.

""Warn him about what?"

"We don't know," confessed McBride. "That's why we're all on edge. It must be an uprisin'."

That word was enough to strike chill fear into the heart of any Canaan-dweller. The blacks had risen in 1845, and the red terror of that revolt was not forgotten, nor the three lesser rebellions before it, when the slaves rose and spread fire and slaughter from Tularoosa to the shores of Black River. The fear of a black uprising lurked for ever in the depths of that forgotten back-country; the very children absorbed it in their cradles."


Robert E. Howard, 'Black Canaan'.