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February 19th, 2008

Paper Cities Trailer



I love the idea of trailers for books, really I do.

2012




Where will the world be in four years’ time?

Eleven of Australia’s top authors take a guess in 2012. Each story imagines the world as it might be, presenting unique possibilities for the very near future. There are dark visions of water and oil shortages, terrorism, climate change, global and regional politics, the limiting of personal freedoms such as free speech, struggles with the ethics of genetic engineering and bioengineering, alien conspiracies, and the impact of technology on industry. There are personal stories here too – of the way these things might impact on families, and how we at an individual level might react to the catastrophes predicted to lie ahead.

Each of these stories presents an original take on the imminent future of humanity. Each has something to say about who we are and who we might want to be. 2012 is both a call to imagine the future of the world and a call to create it.

Deborah Biancotti Martin Livings Dirk Flinthart David Conyers
Simon Brown Lucy Sussex Tansy Rayner Roberts Kaaron Warren Angela Slatter
Ben Peek Sean McMullen


You can preorder it here for twenty bucks off the Ticonderoga website, or buy it it straight from the publisher here.

Today's Holy Shit Moment

Immigration Minister Chris Evans has ordered a review of his role, saying he feels the position has too much power.

Senator Evans has told a Parliamentary Committee there was a substantial increase in ministerial powers under the previous federal government and has commissioned a report into how that could be changed.

He says powers once used rarely in immigration matters have become the norm.

"I have formed the view that I have too much power, in terms of the power given to the minister to make decisions about individual cases," he said.

"I'm uncomfortable with that, not just because of concern about playing God, but also because of the lack of transparency and accountability for those decisions."


Link.

A Little Story About A Girl And A Boy.

My friend Jhayne (porphyre) is taking 365 photos this year, which is good, because she's got quite an eye with her camera.

Somewhere along the line, we began talking about shins, and then ankles, and then she told me that if I wrote a story for her, she would take a photo of her ankles as part of her project. Me, I figured it was Valentine's Day, figured who didn't like ankles, and figured it would be just shiny. I figured a lot that day and I figured well:

When she was thirteen, she decided to hide her ankles beneath thick stockings.

The decision was reached two days after her birthday, a quiet day that was marked only by the twenty dollars her mother, in a new relationship of divorce and unemployment, gave her. Being quite indescribable (and by this, I mean the author refuses to divulge, and shall keep a secret just for himself) she caught the bus into a cold, grey sprawling shopping complex to buy a Joy Division album that she would not like much, later. It was on the return cold bus ride where, sitting at the back, that she met a man who offered her forty dollars to show him her ankles. He, unlike her, was describable, but only by his one defining characteristic which was that he had legs made from hollow, but polished wood, and which stuck awkwardly into the isle as he turned to face her. He was young, also, though older than her by her life at least; the rest a reader will have to decide, based on tone, sympathy, and their own imagination, just how much older, and how attractive or not that he was. Still, back in our bus, and our girl, the heroine, reasoned in a pragmatic way that if she didn't like the black covered album in her bag, that she would come out no worse for wear—and in fact would come out better—if she agreed to his proposition.


Follow the link to see the photo, and to read the rest of the little story. You know you must.

Link.