?

Log in

The Past | The Previous

True Blood, Season Three

Early on during season three of True Blood, there was a moment where I thought that the series was verging on Twilight-like romance and drama, and I decided that the series had a couple of episodes to keep my attention, or that was it.

Fortunately, True Blood went gay, and the gayer it went, the better it got.

Season three opens where season two left off, with vampire Bill being kidnapped shortly after proposing to Sookie, Jason having shot Eggs in the head, and Jessica having killed a truck driver whilst feeding on him. Unfortunately, the melodrama jumps a few easy rungs when Sookie learns that Bill has been kidnapped by werewolves, and a reasonably attractive, bearded werewolf shows up to help her find him. It's probably unfair to say that the show swerved too close to a kind of Twilight world, with its vampires and werewolves and normal girls, but the whole thing was just a bit too camp for my liking, especially once the werewolves started branding their werewolf women and howling in a bar to make everyone change. Fortunately, however, the show managed to save itself by having Tara kidnapped, giving Lafayette a relationship--some of the most tender moments in the series was found here--and allowing Eric a lot more run of the show. In short, it managed to actually produce a very good season in response to the really quite solid season two, though the ending of season three was, frankly, rubbish.

In short, and without giving away any spoiler?

Too many cliffhangers, no resolution whatsoever.

Still, what the show did this season that saved itself was bring in the vampire politics through the character of Russell Edgington, the neighbouring vampire king. Usually, vampire politics are kind of stupid (and so, you know, are vampires), but sitting at around three thousand years old and with his husband Talbot, actor Denis O'Hare was pretty much allowed to chew on the furniture while being a kind of vampire god. It was pretty funny for the most part and he quickly became the best of the villains that the show has had so far. Perhaps that's not saying a whole lot, but his introduction allowed for the Kings and Queens aspect of the vampires to be drawn out a little stronger, and for the secrets of Bill and Eric to be played. Truthfully, it's probably fair to say that the latter's secrets were the influential force of the series, and the strongest thread through the entire twelve episodes, with Alexander Skarsgard stealing the show in his various roles. I'm also fairly sure a thousand slashie hearts skipped a thousand slashie beats at one point during the season, which is good, since it was better than giving the werewolves more screen time, right?

Right.