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New Literary Movement

I have just read some of Knifepoint Horror, Volume One and, now that my eyes have stopped bleeding, and I have stopped laughing, I am going to share it with you.

It will, perhaps, surprise you to learn that Knifepoint Horror is in fact a movement, of the literary kind, and of the horror literature kind (which has always been very special for literature movements). The movement--of which I will include the rules below--is the idea of Soren Narnia, and its rules are ones that, basically, strip back anything that resembles prose, and renders a story in one long block of capitalised text, without a title. Of course, you might see the flaw in saying that you can't have a title and then calling a book Knifepoint Horror, but anyone who can produce two hundred and forty nine pdf pages of capitalised, no dialogue exchanged first draft vomit is obviously someone who isn't going to be too fussed with those rules that he or she has created for their own literary movement. Interestingly, one might note that while the rules state that no paragraph breaks take place, they in fact do exist, in the form of large dots, this ruining the continuous wall of screaming text result.

But!

Don't take my word for it. Below are the rules and a link to the free pdf of Knifepoint Horror:

THE DICTATES OF KNIFEPOINT HORROR

1) The story must be told in the first person, and begin with a simple statement of the narrator's name.

2) There can be no entry into the minds or voices of characters other than the narrator’s.

3) No standard exchanges of dialogue can be included.

4) Regardless of the length of the story, there can be no chapter, sectional, or even paragraph breaks. It must be revealed in the uninterrupted grammar of someone who simply cannot stop until the story is fully told. Changes in a line of thought can only be noted by a simple mark between sentences.

5) Extensive descriptions of settings or characters which do not propel the story forward are anathema to knifepoint horror. The genre focuses entirely on the unfolding of the story's essential spine.

6) The story must be written so that it authentically mimics the sound of one person relating a chain of events to another through a rudimentary personal confession, single long journal entry, or oral account. Literary devices such as extended flashbacks, non-linear structures, diary or epistolary formats, or other unusual techniques dilute the intent of knifepoint. Forbidden are such tools as prologues and epilogues, one-sentence paragraphs designed for shock or suspense value, introductory quotes, asides, and any hint of humor or romance.

7) The story must be told entirely in cold, emotionless uppercase letters.

8) The story can have no title.


Knifepoint Horror, Volume One.

Personally, I think Knifepoint Horror is going to make a fine thing to read on the street corners of Sydney with a microphone. MY NAME IS WILLIAM ROYDON, I will scream, IN OCTOBER OF 2005, I WAS CHECKING THE LOCAL PAPER FOR JOB LISTINGS, LOOKING TO MAKE A FEW EXTRA DOLLARS WITH MY VIDEO CAMERA BETWEEN WEDDING GIGS, WHEN I CAME ACROSS AN AD FROM A MAN LOOKING FOR A VIDEOGRAPHER FOR A DAY. HE WAS OFFERING FIVE HUNDRED DOLLARS TO ANYONE WITH A HIGH QUALITY CAMERA WHO WAS WILLING TO SIGN A CONFIDENTIALITY AGREEMENT ABOUT THE JOB. I SENT AN E-MAIL EXPLAINING WHY I WAS SUITABLE FOR THIS TASK, AND TWO DAYS LATER I GOT A RESPONSE. I WAS TO MEET THIS MAN, WHO SAID HIS NAME WAS FORSCH CORDING, IN THE TOWN OF ROBIN SONG, VIRGINIA, WHERE I WAS BORN AND LIVED UNTIL I WAS TWELVE YEARS OLD.

Comments

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mattdoyle
Jul. 27th, 2007 05:00 am (UTC)
looks more like a bowel movement than a literary one
benpeek
Jul. 27th, 2007 05:04 am (UTC)
you heathen ;)
mattdoyle
Jul. 27th, 2007 05:59 am (UTC)
hmmm...is it an australian movement? if it is, YOU ARE NOT ALLOWED TO CRITICISE IT! ;)
benpeek
Jul. 27th, 2007 06:52 am (UTC)
no, it's not, so i can say whatever i want wihtout fear of geoff maloney and others coming to this blog to slap my hand and say, 'bad dog, bad.'
(Deleted comment)
benpeek
Jul. 27th, 2007 05:51 am (UTC)
oh, i don't know if it ruins horror.
(Deleted comment)
benpeek
Jul. 27th, 2007 06:51 am (UTC)
yeah, she sent it to me.
speshal_k
Jul. 27th, 2007 05:51 am (UTC)
Where did you find this?
benpeek
Jul. 27th, 2007 05:51 am (UTC)
nick kauffman's blog.
nick_kaufmann
Jul. 27th, 2007 01:59 pm (UTC)
I find your spelling of my last name...creative.
benpeek
Jul. 27th, 2007 02:04 pm (UTC)
heheheh.
(Deleted comment)
benpeek
Jul. 27th, 2007 08:48 am (UTC)
I'M SORRY I CAN'T REPLY BECAUSE I'M STARING AT YOUR CHEST AND I'D APOLOGISE BUT YOU KNOW HOW IT IS.
ex_benpayne119
Jul. 27th, 2007 08:31 am (UTC)
Wow. That sounds... really annoying.
benpeek
Jul. 27th, 2007 08:48 am (UTC)
NEVER.
buymeaclue
Jul. 27th, 2007 12:56 pm (UTC)
Wait, Soren Narnia? For real?
benpeek
Jul. 27th, 2007 01:07 pm (UTC)
if i typed it, it must be true!

(unless it's a typo)
kathrynlinge
Jul. 27th, 2007 01:29 pm (UTC)
From http://soren-narnia.com/:

When I was in the fourth grade, my teacher asked me to sit next to a handicapped kid named Sean and help him along a little if I could. It wasn't easy, because he was quite slow, but I tried. When Sean got especially excited about something, or if he was told he had done something well, he would smile and shout out nonsense words. One of them I remember, which he used to shout many times over the few months I sat beside him, was "Sorinarneeya!" Again and again, it was a harmless word he used when he was happy, and seeing my puzzled expression would just make him say it once more, even more pleased than the first time: "Sorinarneeya!" For some reason that word stuck with me for years, until one day as an adult I realized how neatly and curiously it cut in half. And I thought that was so perfect, how this little gem of a thing had sprung from a bit of the absurd and a bit of the tragic. That seemed like all of life to me: momentary bits of perfection out of all the absurdity and tragedy. And amazingly, they just keep on coming.

(they sure do!)
buymeaclue
Jul. 27th, 2007 01:41 pm (UTC)
Oh, my.
benpeek
Jul. 27th, 2007 01:49 pm (UTC)
you should really read his blog: http://www.soren-narnia.blogspot.com/
buymeaclue
Jul. 27th, 2007 01:51 pm (UTC)
This is a joke, right? You're all making fun of me.
benpeek
Jul. 27th, 2007 01:55 pm (UTC)
pfft. like i'm writing 240 odd pages of capitalised nonsense just for a gag.
hollowpoint
Jul. 27th, 2007 03:56 pm (UTC)
Does it count as a movement if you're just taking stories from "for the love" horror webzines and using the 'change case' function in Word?

Because if it does, I have a hot new literary SF manifesto. The focus is on alien linguistics, and it's called ROT-13.
benpeek
Jul. 27th, 2007 11:47 pm (UTC)
heh. is this dude just nicking the stories?
hollowpoint
Jul. 28th, 2007 12:36 pm (UTC)
Dunno - I doubt it, I was joshing. Though I expect a lot of the stories in the collection are just standard horror stories that the authors rejigged to fit the "manifesto".
mallory_blog
Jul. 27th, 2007 04:36 pm (UTC)
My admiration of the new urrr movement expands - do you know that you are the 4th person on my flist blogging about this in the last 2 days. I kind of wonder if AUTHOR WHO USES ONLY CAPS is aware of their burgeoning bloggish fame...
benpeek
Jul. 27th, 2007 11:48 pm (UTC)
yes, but the important thing to note here is that i was here--second!
elenuial
Jul. 28th, 2007 03:23 am (UTC)
Interesting. A story that screams itself at you from inside the narrator's brain. I don't know how much you can do with it, but interesting.
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