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The Office Problem.

Today, the Office revealed itself to be a confined, closed in area. I don't like confined, closed in areas. The moment I step into a car, I roll down the window; in rooms I open windows, all the windows; submarines impress me not at all. It's not just the walls, you understand, it's the roof, the lack of sky, the knowledge that I am unable to move, that there is no where to go. My solution for a confined, closed in area is simple: I leave.

On Tuesday, the Office will be known as a confined, closed in area. I will take a sledgehammer in with me.

Comments

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benpeek
May. 10th, 2005 11:28 pm (UTC)
yeah, kate was doing some work work and wanted to be left alone (hence the shut door). i didn't stick round long, anyhow, as i wasn't doing real well with office environment yesterday.

it's a shame about the piece. what we they saying?
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benpeek
May. 11th, 2005 02:16 am (UTC)
that doesn't sound so bad, all things considered.

first, you got to look on the up: you got a response. people thought something about it. which, i dunno if you get this in your class, that can be a thing. gettting someone to actually comment and think about it. in workshop environments the whole 'i like it, it was good' comment more often than not translates into, 'i don't think anything but it passed the time.' so, without being there and knowing the class, i'd say you were off to a reasonable start there.

you can ignore the comments from people who didn't like having to work the narrative. they come under 'story didn't work for them'. that means their comments were the ever unhelpful stream of, 'i'd like to rewrite this story into something that would appeal to me, thankyou very much.'

as for the other stuff, well, you got to decide what is working and what isn't. getting your perspective down first is a good idea, cause it'll allow you to hang everything else off it. especially if, in this case, the story hinges off the fact that you have a child narrator whose voice is that of a child. other stuff can be added, subtracted, switched, moved and so forth once you comfortable with it. which, you know, if you are, is cool.
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benpeek
May. 11th, 2005 02:51 am (UTC)
that's what a lot fo writing is, really: rewriting rewriting and rewriting. it's good if you can see a little big of a thing to aim for at the end, as it'll keep you going.

also, with class comments, just remember that it's not personal. they don't know you. they're not responding to you as a person. just some words on paper. that way you can disconnect yourself from it a little.
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benpeek
May. 11th, 2005 04:38 am (UTC)
professionals handle it in various degress of grace and hate. did you ever seen anne rice going spastic over user reviews at amazon.com?

the best advice for reviews and comments i ever heard was, 'don't ask.' that's why i never ask people what they think of something when it's published. if people like it, they'll tell you. if they hate it, they may do the same thing. if they feel nothing, they'll say nothing. but despite all this, i simply don't ask. makes life easier.

plus, if i never ask, i will never be asked to voice my opinions on the work of other authors. not, i'm pretty sure, that they wish to ask me :)
deborahb
May. 10th, 2005 02:30 pm (UTC)
Sledgehammers are not good company. Try taking a teddy bear instead. Or, a pet window.
benpeek
May. 10th, 2005 11:28 pm (UTC)
but i wanna break things!
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