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The Past | The Previous

chapter fourteen: toward abolition.

a chapter detailing sir john franklin and alexander maconochie, and their place in the history of tasmania, australia, and norfolk island. and in maconochie's case, his ideas on prison reform, which would become important much later, and which would also see him turn the dread norfolk island into a place that was not about scaring the convicts in sydney. it went back to being this after he was dismissed, however.

franklin is the same explorer who died in the antarctic, starving and searching for a pass through the ice. he made a poor governor of tasmania, but this was overlooked by the fact that in his death he found the pass, and became one of those beloved explorers, even though there was the indication of cannibalism on his vessel.

it was here, also, that the movement to stop transportation took further strength, and that charles dickens enters the fray, if only on the edges and with a magazine. and i guess with great expectations, but this was somewhat later.

chapter fifteen: a special scourge.

another chapter on the work of england to make certain places of australia a criminal horror. norfolk island gets run by 'the demon' price, and he has many previously mentioned horrors added to him. many of them mentioned on previous notes on norfolk island. transportation to sydney stopped in 1840, around nine years before gold was found, and eleven years before the gold rush began and transportation came to a stuttering end.

chapter sixteen: the aristocracy be we.

gold, gold, gold, there is gold in them there fields. a fortune of it, to turn around the lives of many men and women, and to send them out into the mud, panning and working for money, and, in addition, keeping convicts away. but it was the flush of economy, of money, and of the following desire to be free of the stain of convictness and criminality that finally did in transportation.

chapter seventeen: the end of the system.

hughes spend the last twenty pages of the book summing up the previous five hundred and eighty pages, and listing the general failure that turning australia into a jail was.

and that's that. the book became less and less what i wanted and thus needed as it continued, but it was still interesting enough. next? who knows. there is a pile of books here, so i have only to pick one up...